Demián Bichir

"Cesar Chavez" Los Angeles Premiere - Arrivals

Bichir in 2014, photo by Prphotos.com

Birth Name: Demián Bichir Nájera

Place of Birth: Torreon, Mexico

Date of Birth: 1 August, 1963

Ethnicity: Mexican, one quarter Lebanese

Demián Bichir is a Mexican and American actor. He is the son of actors Alejandro Bichir (Alejandro Bichir Batres) and Maricruz Nájera (María de la Cruz Nájera Botello). His siblings, Bruno Bichir and Odiseo Bichir, and his nephew, José Ángel Bichir, are also actors. Demián has a daughter.

Demián’s paternal grandfather was Abraham Bichir (the son of Bielir Ali and Aneha Asayad). Abraham was from Mlij, province of Syria, which likely was Mlikh in Jezzine district, Lebanon.

Demián’s paternal grandmother was Maria del Refugio Batres (the daughter of Angel Batres and Maria de la Luz Ramos). Angel was the daughter of Celso Batres and Valentina Sánchez. Maria was the daughter of Pedro Ramos and Micaela López.

Demián’s maternal grandparents’ surnames were Najera and Botello.

Sources: Marriage record of Demián’s paternal grandparents, Abraham Bichir and Maria del Refugio Batres – https://www.familysearch.org

Marriage record of Demián’s paternal great-grandparents, Angel Batres and Maria de la Luz Ramos – https://www.familysearch.org

24 Responses

  1. Johnsonades says:

    If we go by science and what the scientific studies say then, and I quote, “today’s Lebanese Christians in particular are more genetically similar to locals from the Roman period, which preceded the Crusades by more than four centuries” as per https://jwp-nme.public.springernature.app/en/nmiddleeast/article/10.1038/nmiddleeast.2019.58

    Another study affirms and I quote that “Lebanese Christians form a private branch with the Christian populations of Armenia and Cyprus” as per https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3585000/

    I believe Lebanese Christians are a mix of ancient Caucasian Anatolians with the indigenous people of the Levant (Canaanites). They became Arabized after the Arab conquest of the Area but that does not make them ethnically Arabs.

    Since the descendants of the diaspora do not speak Arabic nor are culturally Arab I think its incorrect to consider them “Arab Christians”

    When it comes to the Syrian Christians I think is a bit more mixed there since from my reading seems like some of the Greek Orthodox Christians from Syria are descendants of Arab tribes that converted to Christianity early on in the 1st-2nd century AD.

    I do think though that a chunk of the Syrian Christians that immigrated to America from Damascus and Aleppo are possibly of Lebanese Christian descent since Damascus was the cultural/intellectual city of Ottoman Syria until the fall of the Ottoman Empire in 1917. Aleppo was the commercial city of Ottoman Syria as well so lots of Lebanese Christians likely migrated to those two cities for work and commerce since at the time Beirut was a port of not the most importance.

    • andrew says:

      Thanks for the reply.

      Agree with you, I think Lebanese Christians are not Arab at all, but they were just “Arabized”.

      About Syrian Christians, I dont see a dramatic difference.

      Actually it looks like most if not all Syrian/Lebanese descendants in New World hail from Christian families, and they use to dont look like Arab people at all, becuase as we have established, they are not ethnically Arab.

        • Johnsonades says:

          “In 2001, a coalition of Assyrian-Chaldean and Maronite church organizations, wrote to the Arab-American Institute, to reprimand them for claiming that Assyrians were Arabs. They asked the Arab-American Institute “to cease and desist from portraying Assyrians and Maronites of past and present as Arabs, and from speaking on behalf of Assyrians and Maronites” http://www.aina.org/releases/caamletter.htm

          “The Christians from Lebanon are Arabs” is a political agenda pushed to “unite” the country of Lebanon (meaning all the Christian and Muslims sects in the country), unite Lebanon with the rest of the Arab world to avoid isolation and persecution.

          What the agenda fails to see is that it had already been trying by the Maronites/Orthodox/Melkites of the Nahda and the Arab Nationalism of the early 19th century to unite the whole Arab world against the Ottoman Empire which indeed succeeded in bringing it down.

          However the Christians were not protected by the Muslims when the Ottomans persecuted them and France had to intervene back in 1910s. Why? Because it doesnt matter if you tell Muslims that the Christians are Arabs too, since in the end its whether you are a Muslim or not. The Arab Muslims did very little to bring down the Ottoman Empire even though they were being oppressed. Why? Because they still saw the Ottomans as Muslim brothers eventhough the Ottomans were not Arabs.

          The mistake keeps being done now lately pushing the “look guys everybody in Lebanon descends from the Phoenicians” or “look guys were are all genetic cousins here Lebanese, Syrians, Jews, Palestinians”. They keep persevering with the same failed agenda.

          • andrew says:

            Ok. I would like to know the opinion of other notable users of this site like Bablah, Bearboy, Oaken and Passingtime about the topic.

      • Johnsonades says:

        One question. Why is that I see that the changes have been made as well as the comments with the sources I post when I log in but once I log out the profiles dont show the changes and I dont see my comments with the sources I provided?

    • Johnsonades says:

      Another important observation to make is that there are also lots of “Syrians” today from what used to be the Tripoli Eyalet https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tripoli_Eyalet later part the Beirut Vilayet https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beirut_Vilayet and “Palestinians”or “Israeli Arabs” today from what used to be the Sidon Eyalet https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sidon_Eyalet later part as well of Beirut Vilayet
      that are being called of “Syrian descent” or “Palestinian descent/Israeli Arab descent” in the diaspora just because those territories ended up being part of Syria in the north and Israel (before Mandatory Palestine) in the South.

      So for example, someone like Teri Hatcher, whose ancestors left Ottoman Syria before 1917 from Latakia which was of the Tripoli Eyalet for like 500 years and then part of the Beirut Vilayet before the fall of the Empire in 1917 its considered of “Syrian descent” just because that area ended up as part of what is today Syria.

      However when her ancestors immigrated it was part of the Beirut Vilayet-Tripoli Eyalet which makes her actually of Lebanese descent not Syrian since those areas were part of the larger “Lebanon” aka Beirut Vilayet.

      Everybody whose ancestors migrated from what was the Beirut Vilayet should be called of Lebanese descent since all that area was inhabited by Christians of Lebanese descent. Only those whose ancestors migrated from what was the Vilayet of Syria outside of the Vilayet of Beirut as can be seen here https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6a/Ottoman_levant.png

  2. Johnsonades says:

    Mlikh is in Lebanon, previously a province of Syria but that does not make Damian Bichir of Syrian-Lebanese descent, only of Lebanese descent.

    Please change your incorrect and deceiving title in bold as it make readers believe he is both of Syrian and Lebanese descent. Lebanon was part of Greater Syria/Ottoman Syria before 1943. When Lebanon was created those who came from the territory of what became Lebanon started calling themselves Lebanese not Syrian nor Syrian-Lebanese

    • andrew says:

      Is right to consider Syrians and Lebanese of the Christian faith (basically all who came to New World were Christians) as “Arab”? Tell me your opinion.

      • Johnsonades says:

        If we go by science and what the scientific studies say then, and I quote, “today’s Lebanese Christians in particular are more genetically similar to locals from the Roman period, which preceded the Crusades by more than four centuries” as per https://jwp-nme.public.springernature.app/en/nmiddleeast/article/10.1038/nmiddleeast.2019.58

        Another study affirms and I quote that “Lebanese Christians form a private branch with the Christian populations of Armenia and Cyprus” as per https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3585000/

        I believe Lebanese Christians are a mix of ancient Caucasian Anatolians with the indigenous people of the Levant (Canaanites). They became Arabized after the Arab conquest of the Area but that does not make them ethnically Arabs.

        Since the descendants of the diaspora do not speak Arabic nor are culturally Arab I think its incorrect to consider them “Arab Christians”

        When it comes to the Syrian Christians I think is a bit more mixed there since from my reading seems like some of the Greek Orthodox Christians from Syria are descendants of Arab tribes that converted to Christianity early on in the 1st-2nd century AD.

        I do think though that a chunk of the Syrian Christians that immigrated to America from Damascus and Aleppo are possibly of Lebanese Christian descent since Damascus was the cultural/intellectual city of Ottoman Syria until the fall of the Ottoman Empire in 1917. Aleppo was the commercial city of Ottoman Syria as well so lots of Lebanese Christians likely migrated to those two cities for work and commerce since at the time Beirut was a port of not the most importance.

        P.S. Please delete this same message I replied to you in the wrong box

        • andrew says:

          Agree. Lebanese Christians kin to Cypriots and Armenians makes sense.

          They are definitely NOT Arabs.

          • Johnsonades says:

            One question. Why is that I see that the changes have been made as well as the comments with the sources I post when I log in but once I log out the profiles dont show the changes and I dont see my comments with the sources I provided?

          • bablah says:

            @Johnsonades

            For whatever reason, the site is stuck on january 8th, unless you log in, so you’re seeing the state of things as it was on january 8th. I’m hoping it will soon be fixed, because most people that visit the site don’t have an account.

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