Wayne Rogers

2009 TV Land Awards - Arrivals

Birth Name: William Wayne McMillan Rogers III

Date of Birth: April 7, 1933

Place of Birth: Birmingham, Alabama, U.S.

Date of Death: December 31, 2015

Place of Death: Los Angeles, California, U.S.

Ethnicity: English, Irish, French, Scots-Irish/Northern Irish, 1/16th Cuban [Catalan, Spanish, possibly other], smaller amounts of Scottish, Spanish, Welsh, and French Huguenot

Wayne Rogers was an American actor. He is known for playing Captain “Trapper” John McIntyre in the television series M*A*S*H.

Wayne was the son of Lydia (Eustis) and William McMillan Rogers II. His father had Irish, English, and Scots-Irish (Northern Irish), ancestry. His maternal grandfather was of one quarter British Isles/English, one quarter Cuban (with Catalan and Spanish ancestry), as well as French and Spanish, descent. His maternal grandmother was of English, Scottish, Welsh, and distant French Huguenot, descent.

Wayne was married to Amy Hirsh, until his death. He had two children with his former wife, actress Mitzi McWhorter.

Wayne’s paternal grandfather was William McMillan Rogers (the son of Joel Rogers and Madeline McMillan). Joel was the son of John Rogers, who had Irish ancestry, and of Mary Weston. Madeline was the daughter of John McMillan, who was Irish, and of Mary.

Wayne’s paternal grandmother was Juliette Barry Frierson (the daughter of Samuel Reese Frierson and Mary Evelyn Barry). Samuel was the son of James Madison Frierson and Sarah Emeline Conyers. Mary Evelyn was the daughter of Richard B. Barry and Mary Sullivan.

Wayne’s maternal grandfather was George Patrick Eustis (the son of Allain Eustis and Anais de Sentimanot/Sentmanat). Allain was the son of George Eustis, Sr., who was born in Boston, Massachusetts, and had English ancestry, and of Clarissa Allain, who was born in New Orleans. Anais was the daughter of Francisco de Sentmenat/Sentmanat y Zayas, who was born in Havana, Cuba, of Catalan and Spanish descent (his own father was Catalan), and of Maria/Marie Rosa/Rose Philippe de Marigny de Mandeville, who had French and Spanish ancestry. The book The River People in Flood Time: The Civil Wars in Tabasco, Spoiler of Empires, 2014, by Terry Rugeley, states that Francisco’s “father was a Valencian named Ramón de Sentmanat y Copóns, a brigadier of the Royal Army; Don Ramón married one María Ignacia de Zayas y Chacón, a Cuban creole.[Francisco’s mother]”

Wayne’s maternal grandmother was Loula Gray Jordan (the daughter of Fleming Jordan and Julia Janette Sadler). Fleming was the son of Mortimer Harvie Jordan and Lucy Scott Gray. Julia was the daughter of Allious Turner Sadler and Caroline Martha Owen.

Wayne’s great-grandfather Allain Eustis’ brothers were James B. Eustis (James Biddle Eustis), a Democratic politician who served as a U.S. Senator from Louisiana, from January 12, 1876 to March 4, 1879, and George Eustis, Jr., a lawyer and politician, who served as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Louisiana, as a member of the American Party. Wayne’s great-great-grandfather George Eustis, Sr. was a lawyer, who served as Chief Justice of the Louisiana Supreme Court in 1838.

Sources: Genealogies of Wayne Rogers – http://www.geni.com
http://www.genealogy.com

Genealogy of Wayne’s paternal grandmother, Juliette Barry Frierson – http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com

Genealogy of Wayne’s mother (focusing on her mother’s side) – http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com

Genealogy of Wayne’s maternal grandfather, George Patrick Eustis (focusing on his own mother’s side) – http://www.raymondjohnson.net

Genealogies of Wayne’s maternal great-grandmother, Anais de Sentimanot/Sentmanat – http://gw.geneanet.org
http://gw.geneanet.org

Genealogy of Wayne’s maternal great-great-grandfather, Francisco de Sentmenat/Sentmanat y Zayas (focusing on his own father’s side) – https://www.geni.com

Genealogy of Wayne’s maternal ancestor, Ana Mathilde Morales – https://www.ancestry.com

Genealogy of Wayne’s maternal grandmother, Loula Gray Jordan – http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com

Photo by Prphotos.com

10 Replies to “Wayne Rogers”

  1. Ethnicity: English, Irish, French Creole, Scots-Irish/Northern Irish, 1/16th Cuban (Catalan, Spanish, possibly other), smaller amounts of Scottish, Spanish, Welsh, and French Huguenot

    Wayne’s father had Irish, English, and Scots-Irish (Northern Irish), ancestry. Wayne’s maternal grandfather was of one quarter British Isles/English, one quarter Cuban (with Catalan and Spanish ancestry), as well as French and Spanish, descent. Wayne’s maternal grandmother had English, Scottish, Welsh, and distant French Huguenot, ancestry.

    Wayne’s paternal grandfather was William McMillan Rogers (the son of Joel Rogers and Madeline McMillan). Joel was the son of John Rogers, who had Irish ancestry, and Mary Weston. Madeline was the daughter of John McMillan, who was Irish, and Mary.

    Wayne’s paternal grandmother was Juliette Barry Frierson (the daughter of Samuel Reese Frierson and Mary Evelyn Barry). Samuel was the son of James Madison Frierson and Sarah Emeline Conyers. Mary was the daughter of Richard B. Barry and Mary Sullivan.

    Wayne’s maternal grandfather was George Patrick Eustis (the son of Allain Eustis and Anais de Sentimanot/Sentmanat). Allain was the son of George Eustis, Sr., who was born in Boston, Massachusetts, and had English ancestry, and of Clarissa Allain, who was born in New Orleans. Anais was the daughter of Francisco de Sentmenat/Sentmanat y Zayas, who was born in Havana, Cuba, of Catalan and Spanish descent (his own father was Catalan), and Maria/Marie Rosa/Rose Philippe de Marigny de Mandeville, who had French and Spanish ancestry.

    Wayne’s great-grandfather Allain Eustis’ brothers were James B. Eustis (James Biddle Eustis), a politician who served as a United States Senator from January 12, 1876 to March 4, 1879 as a member of the Democatic Party, and George Eustis, Jr., a lawyer and politician who served as a member of the United States House of Representatives as a member of the American Party. Wayne’s great-great-grandfather George was a lawyer served as Chief Justice of the Louisiana Supreme Court in 1838.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_B._Eustis
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Eustis_Jr.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Eustis,_Sr.

    Wayne’s maternal grandmother was Loula Gray Jordan (the daughter of Fleming Jordan and Julia Janette Sadler). Fleming was the son of Mortimer Harvie Jordan and Lucy Scott Gray. Julia was the daughter of Allious Turner Sadler and Caroline Martha Owen.

    http://www.genealogy.com/forum/surnames/topics/rogers/17163/
    http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=PED&db=mlb2&id=P54677
    http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=PED&db=lorenejones&id=I29949
    http://www.raymondjohnson.net/genealogy/pedigree.php?personID=I5696&tree=stewart
    http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=PED&db=bigdocmcd&id=I43419
    http://gw.geneanet.org/pocita?lang=en&n=sentmenat+y+marigny+de+mandeville&nz=de+olivar+vivo&oc=0&ocz=0&p=ana+de+la+trinidad&pz=pilar&type=tree
    http://gw.geneanet.org/garric?lang=en&p=anne+m&n=de+sentmenat+y+de+zayas&type=tree
    https://www.geni.com/people/Francisco-de-Sentmenat-y-Zayas/6000000012625375263
    https://www.ancestry.com/genealogy/records/ana-mathilde-morales_111376466

    1. French Creole appears to be the common term for the white descendants of the people in colonial Louisiana, that spoke the Louisiana Creole language. If you disagree with it, just replace it with French.

    2. This book says the Wayne’s Cuban great-great-grandfather’s mother was a “Cuban creole”.

      https://books.google.se/books?id=Z5z3AwAAQBAJ&pg=PA115&lpg=PA115&dq=ramon+sentmanat+maria+ignacia+josefa&source=bl&ots=Go3o_l72qA&sig=WM54CnAtoL6Lij4COPWQgyf__lA&hl=sv&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi_7r3_hIbWAhXrJJoKHSslDoAQ6AEIPTAG#v=onepage&q=ramon%20sentmanat%20maria%20ignacia%20josefa&f=false

      “His [Francisco de Sentmanat’s] father was a Valencian named Ramón de Sentmanat y Copóns, a brigadier of the Royal Army; Don Ramón married one María Ignacia de Zayas y Chacón, a Cuban creole…”

  2. CORRECTION: His mother is 3/8 Louisiana Creole, not Cajun.

    The Cajuns are descendants of French-speaking settlers in Acadia (modern day Nova Scotia and New Brunswick) who was deported to Louisiana by the British during the French and Indian War. They mainley live in the region known as Acadiana.

    The Louisiana Creoles are descendants of the (mainly) French and Spanish colonists, as well as Africans, in Louisiana before the Louisiana Purchase. New Orleans was and is the center of the Creole culture.

    Wayne’s mother’s ancestors can be traced back to New Orleans, which is not located in Acadiana and was mainly inhabited by the Creoles, before the Louisiana Purchase. Her paternal grandmother’s parents’ surnames (de Sentmanat and de Marigny) strongly indicate French and Spanish ancestry. Most of her grandfather’s mother’s ancestors who were born outside of the French Colony was all born long before the French and Indian War, and the ones who was not had no roots in Acadia (Quebec was a part of Canada and not Acadia). Since Wayne’s mother is a descendant of the mainly French and Spanish colonists in New Orleans, and not from Acadian exiles, or even from the Acadiana region in Louisiana, she is 3/8 Louisiana Creole. Louisiana Creoles can be both white, black or mixed race, just like Mexican people.

    1. I would only use the word “Creole” if his family has African-American ancestry. That’s what a lot of people understand the word to mean in the context of Louisiana. As I understand it, Rogers didn’t have African-American ancestry?

      1. The term “Louisiana Creole” is undoubtedly hard to define. According to all definitions I have read, it denotes the descendants of the colonists in the French colony (regardless of race). They also speak Louisiana Creole French, a hybrid language between French and African languages (the Cajuns speak Cajun French, which is a variation of French).

        Some definitions:
        http://www.frenchcreoles.com/LouisianaPeople/louisiana%20creoles/louisiana%20creoles.html
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louisiana_Creole_people
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creole_peoples#Louisiana
        http://www.experienceneworleans.com/cajun.html
        http://www.huffingtonpost.com/Menuism/cajun-vs-creole_b_1447822.html

        Wayne has no recorded African-American ancestry to my knowledge. To me, his ancestors would fit the definition of Louisiana Creoles, but maybe this is not the way the term is commonly used. It does seem to have meant different things throughout history. What is sure is that he does not have any recorded Cajun ancestry, so to use that term I think is misleading.

          1. That is definitly better. However, I still think that it should be mentioned in his ethnicity, since the Louisiana Creoles have a unique history, culture and language (which the French, Spanish and Africans all share/shared, bringing them together), making them their own ethnic group and distances them from other Americans who are descendants of French colonists. The term French Creole seem to mean Louisiana Creoles of European descent, in contrast to Afro-Creole. Maybe it would be useful. I myself am not an American, so maybe I should not be the one to pick the phrasing, though. You seem to know about its use by the common man.

          2. @Madman

            Quote:
            ( The term French Creole seem to mean Louisiana Creoles of European descent, in contrast to Afro-Creole)

            I am of Creole ancestry, and I’ve spend a lot of time studying this subject .The original Creoles were not the Europeans, they were always the mixed blood Africans. It started way back in West African, with the Portuguese mixing into the African families, to created a group loyal to them, which where Cape Verde comes into play(early 1400’s). Then there’s the Haitian Creole which feed into the Louisiana Creole. Europeans adopted the name later because they liked the prestige of what that word represented. Yes you have white Creoles, but it’s more of a cultural thing(although many are mixed, but want admit to it)

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